Major

Limited Editions

The Limited Edition program was initiated in 1984 to support the New Museum. The majority of New Museum Editions have sold out, and many have been included in exhibitions organized by other museums.

One to two Editions are produced each year, and at least one is unveiled at the annual spring gala.

For further information regarding past, current, and future Limited Editions, please contact limitededitions@newmuseum.org or call 212.219.1222 x266.

Ai Weiwei

Ai WeiWei

Ai Weiwei, Kui Hua Zi (Sun Flower Seeds), 2009
1,000 sunflower seeds in porcelain, sculpted and painted by hand, and handmade glass jar inscribed with title and artist name. 6 1/3 x 4 1/3 x 4 1/3 in (16 x 11 x 11 cm).
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

Edition of 30 plus 12 APs

Exceptionally refined and with the Ai Weiwei’s characteristic attention to detail, this edition for the New Museum, Kui Hua Zi (Sun Flower Seeds), 2009, comprises 1,000 sunflower seeds made of porcelain and painted by hand displayed inside a handmade glass jar inscribed and the artwork’s title and artist’s name.

Kui Hua Zi - which translates as “sunflower seeds” - is a continuation of Ai’s practice of fusing Western and Eastern sensibilities, history, and contemporary political metaphor. The sunflower seeds are a symbol for a sustainable way of life, and are made in porcelain, a material invented in China 1,200 years ago. The image and metaphor of the sunflower seed were omnipresent in Mao’s cultural revolution and often represented the Chairman himself. Packed in a modern household glass, they are a down-to-earth symbol to be used by everyone and emphasize Ai’s combination of the common with the extraordinary. The gesture of enclosing the seeds within a re-sealable jar is part of his larger vision of interactivity in his works and metaphors of Chinese society. The porcelain sunflower seeds represent the one and the many; and the modern with the ancient.

Known for large-scale artworks such as his monumental outdoor sculpture Template, a gigantic construction of 1,001 wooden doors and windows from destroyed Ming- and Qing-Dynasty houses that appeared at Documenta 12 in 2007; Fountain of Light, a large-scale “crashed-chandelier” version of Tatlin’s 1919 Monument to the Third International, which appeared in the River Mersey courtesy of the Tate Liverpool in 2007; and the Bird’s Nest, the Beijing National Stadium for the 2008 Summer Olympics (Ai was the artistic consultant for design for the Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron), Kui Hua Zi (Sun Flower Seeds) demonstrates the artist’s virtuosity at a small scale.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Peter Fischli/David Weiss

Peter Fischli/David Weiss

Untitled (Airport), 2008
Panoramic 5-color lithographic print printed from aluminum plates on three identical sheets of Zerkall Büttenpaper (300 g), 51 1/4 x 33 in (130 x 84 cm) each; 51 1/2 x 99 1/4 in (130 x 252 cm) overall

Edition of 36 with 12 Artists Proofs
Signed and numbered
Printed by J.E. Wolfensberger AG, Switzerland
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

Peter Fischli and David Weiss are consummate innovators. They have moved from medium to medium, deconstructing and rearranging materials and subject matter to create a unique body of work. Since the early 1980s, Fischli and Weiss have quietly revolutionized sculpture, video, and photography. Their aesthetic is dedicated to exploring the commonplace, finding the humor, beauty, and fragility therein.

In 1988, Fischli and Weiss began working on an ongoing series of airport photographs. At first glance, the images appear to be tourist photographs. However, as critic Robert Fleck writes in the duo’s Phaidon monograph, “The images are so strictly constructed and so ichnographically innovative…that they introduced a refreshing shock of oxygen into the closed atmosphere of art photography and into contemporary art as a whole, and have now acquired the status of contemporary icons.”

Fischli and Weiss have had solo exhibitions at the Tate Modern, the Walker Art Center, the Centre Georges Pompidou, and the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, among many others.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Ed Ruscha

Ed Ruscha

Five Views from the Panhandle, 1962/2007
CONOCO–Shamrock, Texas
MOBIL–Shamrock, Texas
FINA–Groom, Texas
ENCO–Conway, Texas
Hudson– Amarillo, Texas
Suite of five silver-gelatin prints
14 by 14 inches each
Edition of 30 with 12 artist’s proofs, 2 printer’s proofs, and 1 Achenbach proof

The artist dedicated this portfolio to the memory of Marcia Tucker (1940-2006), Founding Director of the New Museum from 1977 to 1999.  Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

Five Views from the Panhandle (1962/2007) is a suite of five photographs printed from negatives originally taken by Ruscha on a road trip across Texas in 1962. During this trip he documented the gas stations that lined Route 66 between his childhood home in Oklahoma and his current home in Southern California. Printed from the original negatives by Paul Ruscha and Philip Wegener in Venice, California, in 2006 and 2007 on Arista variable contrast fiber semi-matte paper, each print is mounted on museum board and is presented in a custom-made, cloth-covered clamshell box, and comes with a signed and numbered colophon.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Jeff Wall

Jeff Wall

Rock Surface, 2006
Two silver-gelatin prints in a custom-made cloth-covered box
10 3/4 by 16 1/4 inches each
Edition of 30 with 12 artist’s proofs
Printed in the artist’s darkroom by Mike Grill and published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

Jeff Wall is widely recognized as one of the most adventurous and inventive artists of his generation. Over the past thirty years, Wall has created a distinct body of 130 photographs consisting of his cinematographic pictures using actors, sets, and special effects. More recently, he has been working with un-staged documentary photographs on paper.

Rock Surface, his edition for the New Museum, is a black-and-white diptych exploring geological patterns and dimensions of nature. In both subject matter and presentation, this piece is part of a new chapter in the artist’s work and a continuation of his examination of perceived reality.

This Limited Edition is available.

Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon

Les Règles Du Jeu (Pier-Paolo Pasolini and Leigh Bowery), 2006
Pigment print
36 3/4 by 25 1/8 inches
Edition of 25 with 12 artist’s proofs
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum
Courtesy the Artist and Gagosian Gallery

Scottish artist Douglas Gordon works in a variety of media, including video, film, and photography, and he often uses found imagery to explore how memory and individual identity are mediated over time.  Using iconic sources (often well-known films, filmmakers, or actors) Gordon generates new meanings that both elevate and analyze his subjects. Les Règles du Jeu (Pier-Paolo Pasolini and Leigh Bowery) is a multi-layered image reflecting many of the artist’s key areas of interest.  The black-and-white image was found by the artist on the site of the New Museum building and shows the legendary Italian film director playing soccer with a group of young men.  Both the title of the work and the text printed in red on the picture, “LES REGLES DU JEU (PRINCE / BOWERY),” refers to the rules of soccer and to Jean Renoir’s classic film with a similar title.  They also allude to the downtown location of the future site of the New Museum, to the singer formerly known as Prince, and to the cult figure, performer, and Lucien Freud model, Leigh Bowery. The imagery in the edition also relates to Douglas Gordon’s recent movie featuring French soccer superstar Zinedine Zidane, which was presented during the Basel Art Fair at the St. Jakob Stadium in 2006.

This Limited Edition is available.

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois

The Young Girl, 2006
Drypoint on paper and cloth with hand coloring
14 5/16 by 20 3/8 inches
Edition of 15, each a unique variant signed and numbers
Printed by Harlan & Weaver, Inc.
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

With a career spanning much of the last century, Louise Bourgeois (born 1911) is widely acknowledged as one of the most innovative and endlessly resourceful artists of our time.  Her art plays upon such universal themes as the spiritual and physical lives of women with unsurpassed emotional depth and psychoanalytically inspired surrealism. Bourgeois’s ongoing artistic narrative is marked by autobiographical elements, emotional frisson, and repetition to reveal an emotional truth through her art.  In The Young Girl, she used a single oval plate, etched on both sides, each printed twice, on paper and on cloth, with the cloth hand-stitched to paper.  She has hand painted each of the four impressions with gouache, watercolor, and pencil.  Each work in this edition of 15 is a unique variation.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Anish Kapoor

Anish Kapoor

Turning the World, 2005
World Atlas slipcase with letterpress
Open atlas dimensions: 14 1/2 by 23 3/4 by 3/4 inches
Edition of 26 with 12 artist’s proofs; colophon signed and numbered
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum
Fabricated by Factum Arte, Madrid

Taking a cue from current events, British artist Anish Kapoor furthered his formal exploration of the void in this new work. Using the field provided by a world atlas opened to pages displaying the Middle East, Kapoor incised and painted geometric shapes on both the recto and verso. Negative space, for instance, is created by a red circle carved out on the left and a red square carved out on the right. These extend through the entire depth of the book and leave nations demarcated and divided by cartographic abstractions. Each signed and numbered edition is displayed in a slipcase, with painted front and back cover and spine.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Jim Lambie

Jim Lambie

Dubtronic, 2005
Concrete, ceramic, metal, electric power cord, and lightbulbs
Edition of 30 with 6 artist’s proofs
16 by 7 3/4 by 8 1/2 inches
Published by Lisa Ivorian Gray, New York for the New Museum

To create Dubtronic, Scottish artist Jim Lambie cast two functional lamps in concrete. The sculpture lights up when a thick, neon-colored power cord is plugged into an outlet. With Dubtronic, Lambie has given new life to ordinary desktop lamps by imbuing them with glamour. As a result, he extends these domestic objects into the realm of metaphor.

Lambie, a musician and DJ, frequently includes references to pop culture and rock ’n’ roll in his work. He’s particularly interested in the reggae genre of dub, which involves DJs reinterpreting songs in battles with other DJs. The dub tradition informs Lambie’s appropriation and reworking extant objects. Just as a disk jockey puts his or her own twist on music, Lambie invites collectors to personalize Dubtronic by adorning it with colored lightbulbs of their choosing.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Hiroshi Sugimoto

Hiroshi Sugimoto

La Boite en Bois (The Wooden Box), 2004
Glass
16 1/2 by 10 by 1 3/8 inches; box 23 5/8 by 13 by 3 7/8 inches
Edition of 35 with 10 artists's proofs
Signed and numbered on the colophon page
Published by Carolina Nitsch for the New Museum

Hiroshi Sugimoto is celebrated for his multiple series of black-and-white photographs that explore the themes of time, memory, dreams, and the history of representation. For La Boîte en Bois (The Wooden Box), Sugimoto photographed the University of Tokyo's replica of Marcel Duchamp's seminal piece The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) forty five times with an eight-by-ten camera. Each piece in the edition consists of a set of original negatives, as well as the corresponding black-and-white contact prints between two pieces of glass.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Jim Hodges

Jim Hodges

Wandering, 2003
Lampworked glass
20 by 8 1/2 by 12 inches
Edition of 25 with 6 artist’s proofs
Produced by Lisa Ivorian Gray for the New Museum

Jim Hodges’s artwork often reflects themes of love, life, and mortality. Wandering, a handcrafted, gnarled branch covered by moss, flakey bark, and dried-up berries, as well as a black widow spider and a bright red ladybug, was created through a labor-intensive process called lampworking. Each sculpture in the edition is unique. Hodges recalled his personal experiences and memories of collecting tree branches in the woods in order to create this piece.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson

The house that made up its vision as it walked, 2003
Argon mercury, Argon, 8 mm glass, 10 mm glass, and aluminum
17 by 17 by 17 inches with base 4 1/2 by 18 inches
Edition of 25 with 5 artist’s proofs, signed and numbered
Produced by Lisa Ivorian Gray for the New Museum

Olafur Eliasson’s provocatively titled sculpture, The house that made up its vision as it walked, is an elegant, minimal, duo-colored crystal shaped house structure that encloses a system of never-ending Piranesi-esque staircases made from neon tubes.  An active sculpture, neon tubes light up at varying sequences, constantly changing viewers’ perception of the work.  Encountering the work from above, the staircases look as though they continually ascend and descend, but from a side view, they appear flat and disconnected.  The twisted staircases lend the sculpture a certain techno-romanticism, giving a nod to the Renaissance era’s preoccupation with perspective. Also reminiscent of modernist tabletop sculptures, particularly Russian Constructivists, this work reveals Eliasson’s obsession with models, as the mechanism of the piece is visible and integral to the experience of the work.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu

Rogue Ascension, 2002
Print on Somerset Satin white paper and Denril vellum
32 by 24 1/2 inches
Edition of 35 with 7 artist’s prints
Printed by Maurice Sanchez and produced by Lisa Ivorian Gray for the New Museum

An astute draftsman, Julie Mehretu’s abstract gestures, interlacing lines, baroque graffiti, animated explosions, and multiple vanishing points reveal the different dimensions that coexist within this invented universe while illustrating a complex overlapping of time, architecture and movement through space. A color lithograph printed on Somerset Satin paper forms the base of Rogue Ascension, and two sheets of transparent Denril (a drafting and art vellum with a matte surface) sit on top. The Denril sheets have black and white lithographs printed on both sides. Mehretu’s mark making lends itself beautifully to lithography; the plates are layered, creating a sense of depth and flux, and the different intensities of the black plates create both fine architectural lines and luscious washes. This imagery stems from Mehretu’s vivid imagination as well as her personal experience of living in varied communities, such as Ethiopia, Senegal, Zimbabwe, Michigan, and Texas. Other imagery is more universal and easily recognizable such as a subway car window zooming through space, rays of sunshine breaking through ruins, and the ascension.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons

New York Pictures, 1976-2002, 2002
10 digital color flex prints, each 5 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches, plus letterpress colophon, 6 by 9 by 1 3/4 inches
Edition of 50
Courtesy of the artist

New York Pictures, 1976 – 2002 is a collection of 10 images by renowned artist Laurie Simmons. Comprised of 5 black and white and 5 color images nested inside a specially created silver box, New York Pictures, 1976 – 2002 represents 25 years of a dynamic career.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Tom Friedman

Tom Friedman

There, 2002
Plastic and oil-based enamel paint
53 by 53 inches
Edition of 12
Produced by Lisa Ivorian-Jones for the New Museum

There is composed inside part of a hand-polished, plastic minimal white cube, which weighs approximately eight and a half pounds. As if fallen from a great height, the cube rests on top of fifty-one flat “fingers” of brightly colored plastic, which convincingly resemble splatters of paint. Friedman describes the piece as being “like a gavel hitting a podium,” causing the paint to splatter outwards, as if squashed by the cube and propelled by gravity. There is a direct caricature of this idea, and Friedman allows a few solitary drops of paint to escape from the multicolored puddle. Within the piece are references to influences on Friedman’s work. There is a comedic reassessment of the minimalist idea of a grand gesture marking the sense of drama at a given moment.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

PHOTOBOX 01

PHOTOBOX 01

Nine photographs by Naomi Fisher, Candida Höfer, Isaac Julien, Nikki S. Lee, Malerie Marder, Zwelethu Mthethwa, Vik Muniz, Catherine Opie, and Miguel Rio Branco.
Dimensions various; approximately 20 by 24 1/2 inches each
Edition of 40 with 12 artists’ proofs

PHOTOBOX 01 is comprised of nine photographs that affirm the vitality and preeminence of photography in contemporary art. Many of the works included were created specifically for the project, which is the first photography portfolio ever produced as part of the New Museum’s Limited Edition Program.

PHOTOBOX 01 contains work by the following artists:

1. Naomi Fisher , (b. 1977 Miami, FL). Untitled (Bougainvillaea), 2001
2. Candida Höfer, (b. 1944 Eberswalde, Germany). Palacio Real Madrid V, 2000
3. Isaac Julien, (b. 1960 London, England). Untitled (Mazatlan), 1999-2000
4. Nikki S. Lee, (b. 1970 Kye-Chang, Korea). The Ohio Project (16), 1999
5. Malerie Marder, (b. 1971 Philadelphia, PA). Untitled, 2001
6. Zwelethu Mthethwa, (b. 1960 Durban, Kwazulu Natal, South Africa). Untitled, 2000
7. Vik Muniz, (b. 1961 São Paulo, Brazil). Lee Harvey Oswald After Sigmar Polke (from Pictures of Ink), 2001
8. Catherine Opie, (b. 1961 Sandusky, OH). Ron Athey and Daryl Carlton, 2000
9. Miguel Rio Branco, (b. 1946 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain). Fire and the Lioness, 1993

This Limited Edition is sold out.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

Phenakistascope, 2000
Brass, wood, vinyl records, four-plate lithograph print on white Arches paper with chine-collé atlas pages
Print sizes: 12-inch diameter and 4-inch diameter
Sculpture sizes: 11 by 12 by 23 inches
Edition of 40 with 10 artist’s proofs
Courtesy of the artist

Phenakistascope is the first kinetic sculpture edition created by the acclaimed South African artist William Kentridge. Its title refers to a process developed in the 1800s to create animated moving images, and the edition uniquely combines the artist’s multimedia interests in theater, animation, film, drawing, puppetry, and opera. Directly mounted on the wall, Phenakistascope has a bronze apparatus that supports two gramophone records which appear to be floating in space. The turn of a wooden hand crank activates gears that spin the records in opposite directions. When looking through twelve slits on the outer record, the beautiful image on the inner disk becomes animated, magically creating an illusion of fluid movement, in which the characters and objects such as scissors into figures metamorphose.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Rob Pruitt

Rob Pruitt

Alone (Facing East) and Alone (Facing West), 2000
Seragraphic print with enamel ink and micronic mica chips on Koshiji Japanese paper
2 Portfolio editions of 100 with 8 artist’s prints and 2 publisher’s prints
30 1/2 by 38 inches each
Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, Corp.

The panda tends to be the star attraction at every zoo. Rob Pruitt's fascination with the panda, however, extends beyond its universal appeal to his interest in the duality of its yin/yang coloring and its androgynous appearance. For his New Museum Limited Edition, Pruitt has rendered this intriguing wildlife superstar in opalescent white and green glitter.

This Limited Edition is available.

Maya Lin

Maya Lin

Ecliptic, 1999
White Tombasil bronze with satin burnished finish
13 by 1 by 4 inches
Edition of 30, 3 artist’s proofs, and 3 publisher’s proofs
Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery

This is Maya Lin’s first limited-edition sculpture. An experiment with materials new to Lin, Ecliptic was cast in bronze by hand. The sculpture has a sensual form and surface that offers a meditative yet powerful viewing experience. Typical of Lin’s work, which frequently explores the relationship between sky and earth, this piece reflects light and creates shadows that evoke the moon during phases of an eclipse when hung on the wall.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Rona Pondick

Rona Pondick

Sweet Tooth, 1998
Linen, acid-free binder board, basswood, rubber, and plastic
2 7/8 by 13 by 13 inches closed, or 2 7/8 by 13 by 25 inches open
Edition of 35
Courtesy of the artist and Sidney Janis Gallery, New York

This elegant wooden box opens up to reveal a burst of color and a sumptuous surprise: teeth and ears with pieces of furniture and articles of clothing. Sweet Tooth takes Pondick’s famous Little Bathers (1990-91) to a whole new dimension, creating rubber “sweets” in a lavish and unexpectedly enticing setting. Known for her provocative sculptures and installations that are simultaneously hilarious and horrific, Pondick combines dissonant fragments of bodies to make pre-verbal, visceral meanings.

This Limited Edition is available.

Jack Pierson

Jack Pierson

APPLAUSE, 1997
Aluminum, aluminum laminate, maple, plywood, Plexiglas, vinyl lettering, electrical components
10 by 25 by 6 5/8 inches
Edition of 35
Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York

Jack Pierson’s word pieces tap into complex archetypal longings. Resembling marquees and an assortment of commercial signs that announce movies, plays, or peep shows, Pierson spells out words and phrases that transmit desire, such as “paradise,” “maybe,” or “lust.” APPLAUSE, a Limited Edition created to benefit the New Museum and Printed Matter, Inc., is a continuation of this theme. It is a finely crafted re-creation of the type of sign used in television studios to prompt audiences to clap at scripted moments. The sign flashes on and off in slow, pulsing beats, calling attention to the irony of mechanically inducing self-adulation while at the same time taking pleasure in the celebratory sense the single word evokes.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Mona Hatoum

Mona Hatoum

Rubber Mat, 1996
Silicone rubber
23 by 31 by 1/2 inches
Edition of 35
Courtesy of the artist and Alexander and Bonin Gallery, New York

Based on the larger work Entrails Carpet (1995), Rubber Mat uses the metaphor of the carpet and the suggestion of bodily organs to explore human fragility, a recurring focus of Mona Hatoum’s practice.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Andres Serrano

Andres Serrano

The Unborn, 1994
C-print
24 by 28 inches
Edition of 30
Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

This challenging image was created in an edition of thirty in honor of the New Museum’s 17th Anniversary. “Andres Serrano: Works 1983-1993,” Serrano’s exhibition at the New Museumin the spring of 1995, gave the public a chance to view Serrano’s imagery in the context of a consistent body of work that critically investigates notions of religion, violence, homelessness, racism, beauty, morality, and the body.

This Limited Edition is available.

Robert Therrien

Robert Therrien

No Title, 1994
Screenprint on spiral-bound acid-free paper and mixed mediums
24 by 18 inches
Edition of 30
Courtesy of the artist and Leo Castelli Gallery, New York

Robert Therrien comments of his limited-edition screenprint: “Blue oval; all is a mirror, a female apogee, my mother.  Because of the edges, which recede toward the wall and create a shadow, from a distance it seems to float, and because of the paint, it seems solid or hollow.  This shows one aspect of the figure-ground play I’m looking for.”

This Limited Edition is available.

Lorna Simpson

Lorna Simpson

Untitled, 1993
Glass, photograph on linen, etched glass
10 by 2 inches
Edition of 50
Courtesy of the artist

Since the mid-1980’s, this Brooklyn-based artist had become known for her photographic works that deal with issues relating to racial and sexual identity, relationships, notions of the body, and methods of communication. Her New Museum Edition was created at a time when the artist had begun to extend her conceptual photographic work by experimenting with conceptual installation art. This untitled triptych consists of a fragile pair of glass wishbones, accompanied by a photograph on linen of a broken wishbone, and a text etched on glass. It reads: “Clearly if you got what you wished you know you'd end up wanting another wish.”

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Judith Shea

Judith Shea

The Doll, 1993
Hydrocal, horsehair, wire
17 by 6 by 3 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Max Protech Gallery, New York

“Cast of pale Hydrocal, the figure is a standing nude with long blonde horsehair tied into a no-nonsense ponytail.  With her squarish proportions, flatly planted feet, and blank eyes, she recalls archaic Greek kouroi, the huge nude athletes set up as grave commemorations, except, of course, she’s small and female.  Faux-breaks at thighs, neck and wrists enhance the allusion to ancient statuary.  With her head looking slightly upward, right hand clenched and left open in a rhetorical gesture, she looks like she’s ready to question or reason with something or someone bigger than herself.” –The Print Collector’s Newsletter, 1993.

This Limited Edition is available.

Ann Hamilton

Ann Hamilton

Untitled, 1992
Book, stones, lacquered birch, glass
3 5/8 by 9 1/2 by 38 5/8 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Sean Kelly, New York

Ann Hamilton’s rhythmic sculpture is a rectangular glass-enclosed case of lacquered birch. Inside the case is an open, antique hardcover book from which she sliced out a number of pages. The pages were then glued together in a ribbon of text with each line covered in delicate, tiny pieces of colored stones and pebbles she gathered from a California beach. There are forty cases in the edition, each one different.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Bruce Nauman

Bruce Nauman

Untitled (New Museum Image), 1992
Fuji super gloss print
20 by 20 inches
Edition of 150
Courtesy of the artist and Leo Castelli Gallery, New York

For Untitled (New Museum Image), Bruce Nauman took as his muse a wax mask of Rinde Eckert, the German actor who appeared in Anthro/Socio, a video installation that Nauman exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 1992. To create his Fuji super gloss print, Nauman re-photographed Polaroid snapshots with his own fingers poking through the mask's eyes and mouth. The honey tonality of the prints perhaps recalls the gold masks excavated from pre-historic Mycenaean tombs.

This Limited Edition is available.

Donald Moffett

Donald Moffett

Mercy, 1991
Translucent circular photograph mounted on a lightbox
14 inches in diameter
Edition of 100
Courtesy of the artist

Mercy was created for the New Museum in conjunction with the exhibition “The Interrupted Life” in 1991. Each of the 100 works in this edition was created to represent more than 1,000 people who, at the time of Mercy’s creation, had died of AIDS in the United States.

This Limited Edition is available.

Christian Boltanski

Christian Boltanski

L’Ecole de la Grosse Hamburger Straße, en 1938, 1991
Tin box and photographs
8 by 9 by 2 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York

Christian Boltanski relies on the photograph’s deceptive capacity to authenticate the existence of a thing, person or event. The artificially aged tin biscuit box in this piece also suggests—along with a prewar snapshot of German schoolgirls—an archeological find. A group photograph has been marked by hand, enlarged, and shrouded with white cloth. Each tin in the edition contains a different photograph. “Everything,” Boltanski has said, “possesses the power to connote. The more commonplace the object, the more profound its allusions can be.”

This Limited Edition is available.

Haim Steinbach

Haim Steinbach

Untitled (female mannequin right hands), 1991
Ash-veneered wood shelf and objects
17 by 13 by 6 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist, Jay Gorney, and Sonnabend Gallery, New York

Haim Steinbach describes his work as “object groupings.”  Positioning the elements of each group in a specific relationship, they receive “psychological roles and identities.”  In Untitled (female mannequin right hands), two right hands are placed on a wood base, playing on the notions of pairing and twinning.

This Limited Edition is available.

Dennis Adams

Dennis Adams

History Lessons, 1990
Crate, lightbulb, and photographs
33 1/3 by 43 1/3 by 18 inches
Edition of 40

Dennis Adams uses representational photographic images in conjunction with architectural elements to explore contemporary, historical, and social consciousness. History Lessons reveals, behind a crate, a backlit transparent photograph of discarded busts of former French military leaders. Like the history lessons about the Algerian war taught in French schools, the meaning of the image depends on its context.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Christian Marclay

Christian Marclay

Bottled Water, 1990
Glass bottle and magnetic tape
12 1/2 by 4 inches
Edition of 150
Courtesy of the artist

In the fall of 1989, Christian Marclay created Tape Fall, an installation for the exhibition “Strange Attractors: Signs of Chaos” at the New Museum. For this show, he used over 150 reels of tape prerecorded with the sound of dripping water. As a continuation of the installation, the artist created Bottled Water, a special multiple for the Museum. Marclay filled 150 bottles with tape from Tape Fall, silkscreened a text on the front of each bottle, and sealed each one with cork and sealing wax stamped with its edition number.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois

Give or Take (How do you feel this morning?), 1990
Bronze
4 1/2 by 9 by 6 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Robert Miller Gallery, New York

Give or Take (How do you feel this morning?), 1990, Bourgeois’s limited-edition sculpture for the New Museum, is a small clawlike figure without base or supporting structure.  Five fingerlike forms with sharp, polished claws curve to articulate a crawling beast.  Cast from an orangy bronze and oxidized to blacken its crevices, Give or Take has the wrinkled surface of a reptilian skin that gives way to flat planar surfaces with geometric edges on the back of the paw.  The fingers are bloated, ovoid sacs which recall formal shapes introduced by Bourgeois in the 1960s.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Nancy Dwyer

The ME Block, 1987
Honduran mahogany
Edition of 40
13 by 13 by 13 inches
Edition of 40
Published by Josh Baer Gallery for the New Museum, New York
Courtesy of the artist

The 1989 Limited Edition is Nancy Dwyer’s The ME Block, published by Josh Baer Gallery in limited edition of 40 to benefit the Museum.  The ME Block is an approximately 13-inch cube of polished mahogany carved with the letters “M” and “E.” Meant to be read as a three-dimensional interpretation of the word “me,” the piece is also a compelling study of formal elements. Nancy Dwyer’s work is concerned with the mystery surrounding common words, and The ME Block is the artist’s wry commentary on our society’s notions of identity.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Jenny Holzer

Jenny Holzer

Truism Footstool, 1988
Baltic brown granite
16 by 23 by 15 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York

Jenny Holzer began her career as an abstract artist with a focus on painting and printmaking. But after moving to New York City in 1977, she began using text in her artwork, focusing on the use of words and ideas in public space. Street posters are her favorite medium, and she also makes use of a wide variety of other mediums, including LED signs, plaques, benches, stickers, T-shirts, and the Internet. For her New Museum Limited Edition, Holzer had granite footstools engraved with a list of her “Truisms,” sometimes contradictory and sometimes inspiring lists of aphorisms regarding the meaning of life and how it ought to be construed and lived.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Richard Artschwager

Richard Artschwager

Book, 1987
Formica on wood
5 by 20 by 12 inches
Edition of 40
Produced by Brooke Alexander to benefit the New Museum
Courtesy of the artist and Brooke Alexander Gallery, New York

Richard Artschwager’s Book is the latest in a series of specially commissioned limited-edition sculptures by prominent American artists produced by Brooke Alexander to benefit the New Museum.  Produced in an edition of 40, this new work is typical of Artschwager’s oeuvre, which seeks to transform everyday objects into ambivalent structures involving the interrelationship of illusion and reality.  Book is made of Formica on wood and is ideally suited to display on a tabletop, pedestal, or lectern.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Donald Judd

Donald Judd

Untitled, 1986
Aluminum and Plexiglas
27 7/8 by 28 1/8 by 3 1/16 inches
Edition of 40
Courtesy of the artist and Brooke Alexander Gallery, New York

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Bruce Nauman

Bruce Nauman

Double Poke in the Eye II, 1985
Neon mounted on enamel box
Edition of 40
24 by 36 by 6 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Leo Castelli Gallery, New York

Double Poke in the Eye II is a sequentially timed neon wall sculpture mounted on a white enamel rectangular box, which houses a timing mechanism.  This unique work was offered in conjunction with the New Museum’s 1985 Gala Celebration.  All proceeds from the sale of the edition are to benefit the Museum.

This Limited Edition is sold out.

Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg

Tipsy Tilting Neon Cocktail, 1984
Stainless steel, wood
Edition of 40
8 by 10 by 8 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery, New York

This Limited Edition is sold out.




Banner image:
Louise Bourgeois, The Young Girl (detail), 2006 Drypoint on paper and cloth with hand coloring
14 5/16 by 20 3/8 inches
Edition of 15, each a unique variant signed and numbers